Tag Archives: GoGreen Conference

Green Line Series | McKinstry’s Influence in Collaborative Energy

AshAwad01Ash Awad, P.E. is the Chief Market Officer at McKinstry. Ash is responsible for McKinstry’s market development strategy and has more than 20 years experience in the industry. His extensive knowledge covers systems engineering, evaluation of sustainable ideas and development of alternative-financing solutions. During this Green Line Series, we asked Ash a few questions around collaborative energy.  He will participate in the session District and Cooperative Energy | Hot Ideas + Cool Technology in the Seattle 2030 District as a part of the GoGreen Seattle program track on Sustainable Building and Design.

GoGreen Conference: We are excited to learn of McKinstry’s focus on “collaborative energy”, most recently featured in the new Amazon/Westin project in Seattle’s 2030 District. What does “collaborative energy” mean and how does this drive a more sustainable future?

Ash Awad: Collaborative energy is a derivative of the more well-known district energy concept, but instead of a central plant being the supplier of energy that is distributed to a “district” or collection of buildings, one of the buildings within that collection is the supplier of the energy. We like to refer to it as collaborative energy because a number of parties must collaborate to make it work. In the case of the Amazon/Westin project, a private building owner (Westin) had waste heat from its data centers that it was releasing into the atmosphere that the owner thought could have value as a heat source. Another private building owner (Amazon) was about to build its new corporate headquarters across the street and wanted to make that building as energy efficient as possible. Through its policies, the City of Seattle enabled these two private owners to innovate and design a system that captured the waste heat from the Westin, piped it under the street and delivered it to Amazon – thus the collaborative energy concept was born. Collaborative approaches like this are key to driving these cutting-edge outcomes.

The idea of re-using energy that’s been transformed into a different state isn’t new. McKinstry has engineered and implemented waste heat recovery systems many times before.  What is new is doing it on a large scale when energy suppliers and users are different entities and the energy crosses private property borders.

Dense, energy-intensive, mixed-use environments – such as cities – are not only smart ways of using and conserving land, they are also fertile ground for recycling energy.

This renewable model turns waste heat into an asset, rather than a liability, and promises to dramatically increase the energy efficiency of cities while reducing their carbon footprint. It’s a win for energy users because it saves them money and provides them energy price certainty for a long time; it’s a win for the community because we don’t need to bring on more energy generation resources.

We hope that this project catalyzes a paradigm shift in the way communities think about energy use and policy that shapes it.

GoGreen Conference: McKinstry designs the systems to take advantage of waste heat. Can you share new developments with these systems? Any new McKinstry projects launching that will utilize this?

Ash Awad: McKinstry is working on several other energy recycling opportunities. McKinstry thinks of buildings as energy resources – not just energy users. The Westin/Amazon project demonstrates that data centers in particular, are energy-rich environments that can benefit adjacent properties and communities.

The mechanical systems that are the backbone of these types of projects are readily available and are getting more and more efficient. What’s really interesting is the role data is playing in helping us better figure out how to use waste heat. Through the use of technology, buildings are getting smarter, which allows building designers and operators to be proactive in making decisions that affect the efficiency of our built environment.

GoGreen Conference: Our GoGreen business and public sector leaders will be very interested in learning about McKinstry’s work in this area. Can small and medium-sized businesses utilize these new systems? Why should business and public sector leaders care about this?

Ash Awad: This type of system may not be right or even possible for everyone. Retrofits to accommodate this solution can be expensive, and often downright impossible. Facilities with central boilers are good candidates, but if the boilers aren’t fully depreciated or have life left in them, it can be hard to justify replacing them. Utilities or other heat providers must obtain permits and navigate other bureaucratic obstacles in order to add water pipes and other needed infrastructure.

Businesses should care about this because how their facility operates directly affects the perception that people have about their business. Increasingly, building owners are looking for ways to make their buildings more energy efficient not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it is also good for business. Research has shown that a company’s environmental record impacts people’s decision to do business with them. And building owners looking to attract tenants are finding that how “green” their building is can be a huge factor in determining lease rates.

Public sector leaders should care about this kind of innovation because as Oregon-based EcoDistricts describes the promise of this idea: “With the right mix of inspired design, smart planning and skillful execution, cities can be engines of innovation full of talented and creative people who accelerate economic growth, shared prosperity and ecological resiliency.”

This collaborative-energy approach spotlights the opportunity tied up in the massive untapped productivity of energy that resides under our streets and in our buildings in this country. Focused public policies that encourage urban density and public-private partnerships that build stronger neighborhoods are the key that can unlock this potential.

Event Details: GoGreen Seattle, brought to you by King County, will take place Wednesday, March 30, 2016 at the Conference Center located at Eighth Avenue and Pike Street in Seattle, Washington. Tickets are available at seattle.gogreenconference.net or via phone at 206.459.0595.

 

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Green Line Series | Google [e]Team

Kati KallinsDuring this installment of the Green Line Series, we had the opportunity to interview Kati Kallins of Google’s [e]Team: Environmental Design and Construction Projects. She will be joining us on March 30 during the session, The Business Case for High Performance and Deep Green Buildings.

Kallins is on Google’s Real Estate and Workplace Services [e]Team, which is charged with delivering exceptional environments, experience and ecology on Google buildings. She has led sustainable design and construction projects with teams in North America, Europe, and Africa. Using her in-depth expertise on healthy building materials, indoor environmental quality metrics, and strategic communications, she works with project teams to deliver innovative office spaces that promote health and productivity.

GoGreen: There is a lot of buzz around high performance or “green” building right now. What high performance projects has Google completed recently in the Seattle area/WA state?

Kati Kallins: In 2016 Google open two new buildings and doubled the size of our Kirkland Campus, now totaling over 375,000 square feet. Google leases the space from SRMKII, LLC, who built the new space to Google’s sustainability specifications, including targeting LEED platinum certification.

The new building is on a site that formerly housed a chemical mixing and packaging plant. After completing an environmental cleanup in 2012, Google’s property developer, SRMKII, at Google’s request, conducted a second cleanup to voluntarily surpass state standards and remove all detectable remaining contamination at the property, even small pockets of chemicals, at concentrations safely below state cleanup levels. The Washington Department of Ecology has called the cleanup “cleaner than clean” and plans to remove the area from the state’s contaminated sites list.

The new high performance office buildings in Kirkland are designed with a focus on indoor environmental quality (IEQ), efficient resource use, and superior user experience. The new buildings were designed to “bring in the outdoors” because these design features have been proven to improve the health and productivity of occupants. Since people spend 90% of their time indoors this focus is paramount to creating Google’s exciting workplaces. With features like a sky bridge, public park, green roof, vegetative screens, and patios the building achieves Google’s goal to be a vibrant and restorative place to work. A portion of wood used in the office also was harvested from timber felled on-site during construction, so local natural materials can be found throughout.  All interior office furnishings also meet Google’s stringent IEQ Healthy Materials Program that vets building products for health and transparency criteria. The office uses resources efficiently onsite through a rainwater cistern that will reduce potable water use by 76% and a chilled beam HVAC system that will save 55% more energy than a traditional building HVAC system.

GoGreen: How do Google’s goals and values align with its green building strategy?

Kati Kallins: Google has always aspired to be a globally conscious company that is focused on improving the lives of our users and contributing positively to the world’s toughest issues. Doing the right thing and a standard of excellence are part of our fabric at Google – and our green building strategy is an extension of those values.

We work hard to create the healthiest, most productive work environment for our employees. To do that we approach buildings as living systems, designing for natural light and clear air, designing out harmful man-made chemicals, and using natural resources more intelligently. Our approach goes hand-in-hand with our commitment to designing buildings that are sustainable for local and global ecosystems.

We believe that a healthy work environment and a sustainable world begin with transparency and cooperation.  Our focus on creating healthy environments begins with vetting building materials through our Healthy Materials Program.   At Google’s offices worldwide, we put all building products through a rigorous screening process to determine which adhere to our healthy building standards—and we purchase the products that best meet our stringent criteria.

Yet our green building initiatives don’t stop with the building materials in our offices. We make every effort to address the factors that impact people’s experience of indoor environments, such as thermal comfort, daylight and access to views. We also provide aggressive performance benchmarks for energy and water consumption. We use sophisticated building control technologies to ensure systems are on only when we need them. We’ve installed solar electric and solar hot water panels on our roofs, treated water on-site for reuse, and used recycled municipal wastewater for other applications (e.g. toilet flushing and landscape watering). We have the aspirational goal of diverting 99% of construction waste from our projects. Google’s green building strategy is focused on cultivating extraordinary human experiences in the built environment through focusing on the experience of building occupants to optimize health and performance of employees.

GoGreen: Google places a lot of emphasis on helping employees perform at their best. How can small and medium size businesses apply a similar focus to their green building strategies and/or office environments?

Kati Kallins: The strength of Google’s green building program comes from its foundation in our company’s unique philosophy and values. Our initiatives and real estate philosophy are really an extension of our core values as a company. We value our employees as a key part of our success as a company.  So it makes sense that many of our green building initiatives are focused on helping our employees be their best. Our goal as a company is to have happy, healthy, high -performing employees.

For example, at Google our employees work hard to write software code and solve user problems with our products. To help reduce stress in their already chaotic lives we focus on building an office space that improves their health and productivity. For example, research has shown that access to views reduces cortisol levels in the brain (a stress hormone), so we strive to give employees access to daylight and views wherever possible. Our Healthy Materials program also focuses on optimizing indoor air quality by reducing off-gassing materials in the space –  a major health impact for employees. By using water efficient fixtures and purchasing renewable energy for our building operations Google signals our belief in conservation of resources. This is a company principal that many employees take pride in, so the benefits are wide-reaching. Our green building strategy is built around this goal of optimizing the workplace for employees and acting as stewards of the natural ecosystems we live in. This strategy is synonymous with our company culture and aspirations to make the world a better place.

To find out more about sustainability at Google’s Campus Operations, visit their website.

Event Details: GoGreen Seattle, brought to you by King County, will take place Wednesday, March 30, 2016 at the Conference Center located at Eighth Avenue and Pike Street in Seattle, Washington. Tickets are available at seattle.gogreenconference.net or via phone at 206.459.0595.

 

Green Line Series PDX | Keynote, Renee Lertzman, Ph.D.

The GoGreen team recently interviewed GoGreen Portland Keynote, Renee Lertzman, Ph.D.,  Author of The Myth of Apathy. Click the link below to find out more about her educational background and motivation to engage communities of stakeholders through communications.

GoGreen: What was your defining moment that influenced you to go into communications surrounding issues with the environment?

R8Renee Lertzman: It really started out when I was an undergrad in college as a psychology major. What I experienced during that time was a cognitive dissonance where I was coming out of my environmental studies classes feeling really devastated and deeply concerned about what I was learning about – going into my psychology classes and anthropology courses with really kind of no mention of what was going on with our environmental situation.

I set out with a focus on connecting the psychological research world with how we communicate and educate people about environmental issues. My main interest is what we can learn and leverage from insights in psychology, specifically clinical or psychodynamic psychology – which has enormous insight into human behavior and how we relate with change, loss and anxiety. My perception is that when communicating about environmental issues we are raising literacy and awareness and need to be exceptionally mindful of the emotional impact — as we are directly informing how people engage with the information and then choose to act on it. It is fundamentally critical that we look at that dimension and not only what people’s values, beliefs and opinions are. We need to always include the emotional and experiential contexts if we want our work to be effective. We are well past the ‘information deficit’ approach, that if people only know more they would activate somehow.

GoGreen: As a communications professional have you seen a gap between individuals connecting and engaging on environmental issues?

Renee Lertzman: I have seen a gap between what people say they value and what they actually value. The orientation that I’m coming from is referred to as psychosocial – we can’t separate out the psychological and social context in which we live and so from that point of view it’s not surprising that we are contradicting.

We often say one thing and do something else. It’s not really a big revelation – the research tools that we use to identify that gap really only reinforces a perception of a “gap” – if we ask people questions, based on surveys, polls, even focus groups or interviews, we often get a very top of mind story, versus the actual, messier reality of how we make choices and negotiate particular dilemmas about how we live. So our methods and the way we are framing the questions have something to do with this “gap” – something I’ve written about extensively and is key theme in the book I’m writing, Environmental Melancholia.

We need to shift from a persuasion orientation and instead think much more about how we can support, facilitate and engage. It’s not about trying to force or coerce (hopefully). It’s about helping connect people with our own creative and caring capacities. One of the main techniques I focus on is designing into our work a way to acknowledge people’s potential experiences; and say we get it and understand that you might be unsure and that’s okay, then move on into what we can do together. If you skip the first step you’re not really connecting with people.

Communications is about humans and human behavior. I don’t think environmental communications is like any other communications — it’s totally distinct from other issue areas for a number of reasons. I think we need to be working to create basically a whole kind of unique and specific approach to the practice of environmental communications, that takes these psychological and social complexities onboard – this goes beyond just framing around values. It also includes insight into how people resist change, manage anxieties, and deal with losses, both actual and anticipatory. Focusing on inspiration and positive solutions is also important, but it is not the full story and is not as effective when we leave out the rest.

GoGreen: What is an example of a communication strategy that you have seen work to engage individuals in environmental issues?

Renee Lertzman: I think that humor, when practiced skillfully, can be a powerful tool. Humor has a capacity to both allow people to engage with difficult issues in a safe way but it also has the ability to be honest. An example would be Brand Cool’s creation of an energy efficiency media campaign called Irreconcilable Differences – a video series in which they used humor to communicate how people in their homes can get into conflicts about how much energy is being used with battles over control of the thermostat. I think using humor is really wonderful and powerful if it’s done right. The campaign has to have substance to it.

The other platform is the use of conversations. Conversations are an under-recognized, powerful behavior change resource, as we tend to learn, change and grow through social interactions. The Carbon Conversations project in the UK, or the Northwest Earth Institute are examples of bringing people together informally to simply talk about how we can face some of these challenges, and come up with some emergent solutions. Conversations provide the support we tend to need to engage with some of the more challenging aspects of responding to our ecological predicaments. We learn we are not alone in how we may be feeling. This is a way to support people to organize and express their own creativity, which is really important. I think we see glimmers of this through online tools where there are competitions of people sending in their own ideas or the model of the challenge. However, creating interactivity is also important. The things that invite people to get involved, engaged and feeling like they are a part of a conversation as opposed to just passive recipients is beneficial.

GoGreen: What are you hoping our organizational leaders at GoGreen will walk away with and gain from your Keynote Address at the event?

Renee Lertzman: It is important for us to think differently about behavior change. It is time for us to shift our orientation in which we’re used to thinking, such as how do we get people to change, towards how can we support and enable people to express their concerns and investment in our world? That’s a fundamental reframe – when we take that on it changes the nature of the work that we do, because it’s less of a sense of pushing against something and more about how we can leverage and support what’s already there. Our innate care, concern for our planet, and our desire to have efficacy, impact and creativity.

I believe every human being fundamentally has an investment in our world. It’s our job to find out what that is and how to really facilitate that. It’s not about pushing and persuading – it’s more about invitation, facilitation and support. For this, we can tap into human insights and specifically our emotional connections, to help us be profoundly more effective in engaging with people.

Find out more about Renee’s book, The Myth of Apathy online. She is also an Independent Consultant currently collaborating with Brand Cool.

Event Details

GoGreen Portland 2014, brought to you by the City of Portland, Multnomah County and METRO will take place on Thursday, October 16th at the Oregon Convention Center, Oregon Ballroom located at 777 Northeast Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard. Tickets are available online at portland.gogreenconference.net or via phone at 503.226.2377. Early Bird rates are good through Tuesday, September 16th, 2014. Single Admission Early Bird Full Conference tickets are $175 and Group Rate Early Bird Tickets are $150 (groups of two or more). Student, government and non-profit registration rates are available.

Green Line Series PDX | The Responsible Human

Carol Sanford Have you ever wondered if it’s really possible for just one person to make noticeable impact towards greening a business? Renowned author and speaker, Carol Sanford, argues a resounding ‘YES!’ Before Carol takes the stage at GoGreen Portland on October 11, learn the definition of a truly responsible business and how you, as an individual, can drive change from within — even if the word “sustainability” isn’t in your title.

GoGreen Conference: Before we dive into the concept of a responsible human — the topic of your solutions lab at GoGreen Portland — let’s back up a bit. Help us understand the definition of a responsible business. 

Carol Sanford: A lot of us have intentions to try and improve how it is that businesses engage with the world — so they not only do not do harm, but actually create a better world. Most of the time, we try to do this using either advocacy or influence and sometimes all the way up to pressure of some kind. But we’re missing a key ingredient there, which is what I call capability.

We notice that often when we’re seeking change in a person, we have a conversation with them that ends up more like a debate. And even after we’ve given them evidence of something, nothing changes. My premise, and the premise of the responsible business, is that if we don’t build certain kinds of capability, people cannot see why they’re believing what they’re believing and they can’t develop a belief in a change process.

If you really want to help people change and help them change in a way that is much more responsible (which is a word I like a lot), you have to build a both inner and outer capabilities that are much more systemic.

One of these capabilities is the ability to see the world in terms of related, dynamic systems, not as seeings things as “doings.” When we see the world as things, what we do is break it up into pieces, and we end up working on it in pieces. Every time we work on a piece, we usually  cause a bad side effect for something else. For example, we decide we’re going restore a watershed, but what we do is restore that watershed in a way that doesn’t end up creating health and vitality for all the living species, like elk or wolves, that are connected to the water.  We create a solution based on what we know is best for water, but we don’t look at the whole system. I differentiate that from what MIT calls systems thinking, which is built off the study of machines — it’s a fibernetic view of systems that doesn’t necessarily factor in the living factor of natural systems.

The responsible business is based on is learning to see all of those aspects as related and necessary to the success of the whole. I call out five stakeholders as a making up a system. I’d say it starts in business with a consumer. After that, you connect what I call the co-creators to that  node. Co-creators are what we used to call suppliers and employees, but empowering them with a creative and important role in the process. Then you can ask the question: How does Earth become healthier, and how do communities become healthier through our actions? We often forget the Earth and our communities as stakeholders, even though most of our products depend on drawing material resources from the planet and our communities are impacted in almost every decision we make. As a result of integrating all the above aspects appropriately, we insure that the investors get a return.

So that’s a system of thinking and what underlies the responsible business. I’m now taking that into an arena where individuals can look at it how they can live out those same kind of aspects and make impact in their role, whatever it might be.

GG: We like to talk about the spirit of individualism and self-determination in this country. As a co-creator, how do we as individuals fit into that bigger picture — that whole system?

CS: One of the uniquenesses of the United States of America and the nature of its founding is that we are very much rugged individuals. The upside is that it allows us to take on a strong sense of personal agency. The shadow side of that is that it can have us become self-serving and even go so far as greed. The reason I’m working on this idea of the responsible human is to take that cultural characteristic, which I greatly value and believe is something the US can offer to the rest of the world, and build a process for driving it to fruition.

Do we, as human beings, have a unique role in the world? I believe we do. I believe that when we understand and see ourselves as an integral part of a living system — rather than above it or separate from its effects and consequences — we have the chance to discover solutions that support all facets of life and enterprise. I have been committed to that idea for almost four decades of my life, building capability into companies and individuals as they work together in teams, groups towards individual and commons goals.

What I’m going to bring in to this conversation at GoGreen Portland are what I’m calling the six core aspects of building the responsible human so that organizations, businesses, societies, and people have the ability to live out this rugged individualism, this drive, this sense of  personal agency; self-actualizing, in a context that serves the whole.

GG: What are these six core aspect to the approach you’re advocating? 

CS: The subtitle is “Change the world without changing jobs”, right? So we are going to focus on a framework that gets people started on a path to making a difference by developing their own capability. No matter where you are, you can bring about the kind of improvements and evolution in your workplace and society that will benefit us all. To that end, I’m introducing six aspects, three of which are sort of an outer nature and three of which are an inner nature. Before you can focus them on your place of work, you have to think about how to build them in yourself. How do you ensure you yourself are growing in a way that you can be the change agent you want to be. And as you work on yourself, how do you bring those kind of capabilities into the organization via influence? So let me list what those six core aspects are and note that we’ll dive deeper into how each of these applies to the idea of a responsible human during the lab.

  1. Ability to see the world and your environment (work or otherwise) from a dynamic systems perspective and to understand nodal thinking.
  2. Engage in external considering. This is the premise that it’s not all about you and that your actions have impact on other aspects of the systems you exist in.
  3. Transfer your worldview from a fixed performance perspective to a dynamic, developmental perspective.
  4. See each person as unique and as possessing distinct capabilities and talents to contribute to the vitality of a system.
  5. Ability to engage the “internal locus of control.” Take accountability for your actions and help hold others accountable as well.
  6. Move beyond self-actualization into systems actualization. How do you fit into the whole dynamic?

GG: How do we effect the success of our organizations with these tools? If you’re in a business with 10 people, you can really see the effects of your work. But how much difference can one person really take in a huge corporation like Google that has tens of thousands of employees?

CS: All of us know a handful of people that , because of how they are, are influencing everyone’s thinking. I ask this question of people all the time: Think of five people that — because of how they behave and how they interact — command attention and respect, have a sense of integrity and are valued for what they’re bringing to the table. A lot of the characteristics I just talked about here have to do with how we engage even when it’s a one-on-one or small group situation. We have to remember that our behavior changes the dynamics of the group. We forget how much that if we behave differently, other people do too. People are attracted to others who exhibit these characteristics of leadership. We admire, respect and get inspired by people who think about others. People who can see the right place to intervene, the right node to affect. The people who see you as changeable, growable and not stuck in life — and give you that respect. Who see you as unique and distinctive. Who see you as holding yourself accountable — no lying, no excuses, no victimhood — and who see you as trying to help improve the life of not only yourself but also for everyone else.

If you’re practicing and building your capability in all of these areas, it has a huge influence on the rest of the system — I don’t care what office you sit in. And the more you’re able to do this over time, the more effect you have. It has nothing to do with the size of an organization. Let me tell you about one guy who ran a detergent tower in Colgate-Palmolive in South Africa, who’d had only the equivalent of a fourth-grade education. Isaac was his name. Everyone would have said that Isaac, sitting on that detergent tower with no education could have done very little, but Isaac decided because his own children were going to be able to come into this new republic of South Africa, he had to figure out a way to bring some changes. He started talking about it to other people. What he wanted was to improve the health of the children in Selletto, the township that he lived in. He started asking why it was that they made toothpaste and mouthwash, but couldn’t create a way to improve health in the community?

Well Issac kept working on himself and building this dialogue with others out of this vision of what he thought was possible and he eventually was able to get the corporation (it took him about 6 months) and a group of dentists to help educate the children. He started with a set of women who had small businesses and got them set up to sell bolt-and-lock cases of these products to help improve children’s health. He even built the program with dentists in order to measure and track the health benefits, and then he brought in the economic development commission. That was one guy in a factory! So, it’s not about large or small. It’s about the ability to understand that you have to change how you approach change. These six things give you a way to think about the challenge of: How do I move me so that I can move the world?

GG: How do these ideas apply to sustainability efforts?

CS: Sustainability efforts are often very short-sided and limited in terms of their systemic effects. We end up with lists of best practices to work on, things to count, that don’t necessarily improve the health and the wholeness of the planet. No one is ever encouraged to ask about that and expand their view. That’s something we need to work on.

Let me back up to even what people’s current job is. For the most part, when people are working in a sustainability role, what they are empowered to do is bring the kind of conversations that are normally not brought forward, to the front of the agenda. When we did Seventh Generation’s second sustainability report, we said we were no longer going to count just the numbers that reduced carbon or reduced the company’s footprint. Instead we were going to bring forward the story of how it was that those actions set to make a difference to a larger system. So they looked at the air basin which surrounded Burlington, Vermont, and they started to have the conversation about the quality of the air and the quality of life of people who lived there. When you think about thing like the asthmatics of the children who lived in a community it brings a massive idea like global climate change into better focus.

This is what the dynamic developmental view is all about. People had come to see the pollution in their area as something that they couldn’t handle. So instead of Seventh Generation just issuing a report, they engaged the community in a narrative. Gregor Barnam (their Director of Corporate Consciousness at the time) decided that if he was really going to bring about change in how people talk about sustainability, he had to make it personal. So he created an idea of showing people and businesses how they can effect their community by their choices and by how they operate — and that they can really can influence their own health and that of the community.

It was really just three people who created this initiative. They had no titles — they had jobs, I think one of them was a customer service-related person. Gregor ended up working with the title of Director of Corporate Consciousness, but he was one person, he didn’t have a staff or anything. Still, this became a movement across the entire state of Vermont. Now Vermont’s a little unique, but they carried that out and took it into Arkansas. I was with their founder, Jeffrey Hollender, when he went to Wal-Mart and introduced this idea to them about how it is you really ought to be engaging communities around the idea of sustainability, not just doing reports. It was something that really took hold.

GG: For the people attending, what do you hope to accomplish in this session and what do you hope people leave the session armed with?

CS: There are two things I hope they come away with. One is a belief that there are things they can change about how they’re engaging even in small, day-to-day operations — And that these things can have a ripple effect beyond their own thinking and their own wishes and dreams. Many time it feels like you attend a conferences to get inspired from other people, but then you have to go back and work where nobody else cares about what you believe is important — or cares less about it at the very least. I want attendees of this session to go home with the belief that they can be influential in the areas they are passionate about and empowered to take steps to get there.

The second thing is that we’re going to spend time developing a plan on how they can first take action on  building capability in themselves (because all of this has to do with working on ourselves first) and then how they could influence change on something they care about by acting differently in their own right. We’re going to work in small groups, so that they’re not only getting ideas from me from their peers. We’re going to share and reflect on them. I feel like if they walk away with a sense of being a person that can have an effect by changing a few things and if they have one place where they’re gonna take action, that’d will be well worth the time.

Carol Sanford is a renowned author, speaker and business consultant. She will be leading the Responsible Human: Change the World Without Changing Your Job Solutions Lab at GoGreen Portland, Thursday, October 11. You can join Carol for this empowering session and a full day of trainings and solutions-based learning by registering at portland.gogreenconference.net/registration

Green Line Series NYC | Grassroots Engagement Drives Greener Healthcare at NewYork-Presbyterian

Being successful at sustainability is as much about community organizing as it is about operational prowess. In this Green Line Series, we speak with GoGreen NYC speaker and Corporate Sustainability Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Jessica Prata, on how engaging the organization’s staff across departments — from the OR to nurses stations and maintenance — and giving them outlets to participate in NYP’s sustainable practices has catalyzed their capacity for achievement.

GoGreen NYC: Just how much potential does sustainability hold for the healthcare industry? What kind of impact has embracing this philosophy and these systems made at NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP)?

Jessica Prata: As health providers, hospitals are very central to the community. We have a responsibility to provide the healthiest environment that we can for our staff and patients. We also want to create a very safe environment for staff and families to be in, and for patients to heal in, so that’s where the tie comes in for us.

At a glance, some may not immediately see the connection between environmental sustainability and healthcare.  How does recycling and waste management, energy production, efficiency and cogeneration, and transportation fleets connect to caring for patients in the best way we can? In fact proper management in these areas does impact our organization’s ability to provide the highest quality of patient care in a clean and safe environment. If you consider the broad impact that a hospital has in a community, you recognize how these sustainability initiatives contribute to our overall air quality and environmental footprint. Also, the more money we save by managing resources and waste more effectively, the more money we have to spend on creating the best patient experience possible. The dots do connect.

At NYP, we want to keep our patients as healthy as we can and provide tremendous care, all while doing the right thing in the community. We are members of and promote Practice Green Health, a nonprofit organization that gives support and guidance to hospitals as they embark on this journey.

GG: What was the process for making sustainability a part of your strategic vision and plan for how NYP moves forward as an organization? 

JP: Back in 2005, there was a good amount of movement within our facilities department. A lot of initiatives started there as a part of a very aggressive energy management plan. And 2005 is the year we received our first award from the EPA — we’ve since received seven. Then NYP’s senior leadership started to question what other elements of sustainability could be addressed. Energy is a huge component that helps us save money and control our environmental impact, but we felt there was more to take on.

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Green Line Series | NYC ACRE + Micah Kotch’s Growing Web of Sustainable Technology

New York City’s technology sector is alive and kicking, earning acclaim for its solutions driven focus and merging industry clusters to support the vision of a cleaner, greener New York. NYC ACRE Director, Micah Kotch sits down with the Green Line Series to talk about how emerging clean tech companies are playing a role in reinventing New York City as the greenest in America.

GoGreen Conference: What is your perspective on how technology is currently being leveraged to solve sustainability in NYC? In what areas do we need improvement? 

MK: Both here in New York and nationally, we still don’t have an effective energy climate policy in place. That’s the 800-pound gorilla in the room. Without a transparent, long-term program that puts a price on carbon, in one form or another, the technology industry does not compete on a level playing field. And in the absence of national or international leadership, cities are going to continue to blaze a path forward, because cities like New York are most at risk for the negative impacts of climate change.

We see adaption and mitigation as amazing opportunities to spur both job creation and the development of new products for export. Here in New York, I feel like we have a lot unique assets that we’re trying to leverage: the finance industry, the media industry, our mass transit network, the fact that we have a million buildings, and our real estate industry. Also, our tech start-up scene. Our sweet spot is capital-efficient, IT-driven technology business.

At NYC ACRE, we believe that working right at the convergence of energy, water, waste, green building and the mobile and social web, presents a very compelling case for us to help emerging companies grow and get up to scale. We have seven companies that have graduated the program and created about 100 full-time jobs and raised about 17.5 million dollars. Our strategy is to go out and connect the dots that will lead to start of great, long-term companies. We want to get different clusters to spill over and have a real mix of people, ideas, products and services that are ultimately filling this need and that aren’t dependent on government policy to be successful.

GG: You mentioned scalability — you work at the foundational level with start-ups. Since there are a ton of big corporations in NYC, how does the work you do at the ground-level translate up to the Bank of Americas and the New York Times? What role do they have to play in developing these cross-industry clusters?

MK: When you are talking about infrastructures, you absolutely have to work with people who are the gatekeepers. So we have really strong relationships with National Grid and Con Edison. That is absolutely critical because you can’t go to market without the buy-in of those big players. And I think the same holds true with the real estate industry.

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Green Line Series PHX | Boosting The Bottom Line By Greening The Ballpark

In less than a decade under Derrick Hall’s leadership, the Arizona Diamondbacks have become one of the MLB’s most successful franchises on the field and in the realm of sustainability. Building upon a deep commitment to the Phoenix community and a pursuit of innovation on the operations front, the Diamondbacks have proven that greening the ballpark is both financially prudent and the right thing to do as a corporate citizen in the Valley.

GoGreen Conference: What was the motivation for the Diamondbacks journey into sustainability? What was the first initiative and why did you start there?

Derrick Hall: We have a social responsibility to pursue sustainability in all aspects of our operation. We recognize that we can serve as a very strong influencer for local businesses, as well as our stakeholders, such as season ticket holders, corporate partners and casual fans. Every action that we take here at Chase Field can be replicated in the business or home of these people. We figure if these people observe the changes we have taken in such a complex facility, they will be encouraged about following our lead.

The Northwind system was arguably our initial foray into sustainability, and was developed from the need to air condition our facility during the hot Phoenix summer. It uses a chilled water and serves as a sustainable air conditioning provider for most office buildings downtown. Other early initiatives have included recycling programs with Waste Management and solar projects with APS. Several corporate partners are showcasing their own sustainability efforts and we are a strong platform for them to partner with. The Diamondbacks (and its venues) are making some substantial capital investments into facilities.

GoGreen: Why have you chosen to take the leap past simple efficiency retrofits (recycling, LED lighting, low-flow faucets, etc.) and into more infrastructure-related projects? What do you believe the ROI will be literally (financial terms) and figuratively (environmental/community impact/etc.)?

DH: Again, social responsibility leads these decisions. We recognize the business efficiencies and ROI that will result from many of these changes, but this is not the motivating factor behind these investments. Our ownership has an interest in the D-backs becoming industry leaders in all aspects of our business and sustainability is no different. Also, as our facility enters the second half of its lifespan, many areas are in need of renovation or replacement, so it just makes sense for us to include sustainability. Making the change to sustainable components is the easy decision to make and, in some cases, the only alternative (i.e., light bulbs and government policies phasing out incandescent light bulbs and requiring the use of CFL or LED instead).

GoGreen: Have you found programs like MLB Green Tracks to be good motivators? Is it helpful to feel some added pressure from friendly competition? If so, do you think a similar model could be used in other industries successfully? How so? Continue reading